Design Patterns In Action: The Template Method

Welcome back to our cyberpunk world, where hacking is an art form and the Matrix is the canvas. If you’re looking to make a name for yourself in this digital dystopia, you’ll need the right tools and a good understanding of the template method pattern.

Introducing the HackHandler, the ultimate cyberpunk hacking tool, designed to help you navigate the Matrix and steal data like a pro.

interface CyberpunkHacker {
    public function handle();
    public function connectToMatrix();
    public function acquireTarget();
    public function injectMalware();
    public function stealData();
    public function coverTracks();
}

class HackHandler implements CyberpunkHacker {
    public function handle() {
        $this->connectToMatrix();
        $this->acquireTarget();
        $this->injectMalware();
        $this->stealData();
        $this->coverTracks();
    }

    public function connectToMatrix() {
        echo "Connecting to Matrix...\n";
    }

    public function acquireTarget() {
        echo "Acquiring target...\n";
    }

    public function injectMalware() {
        echo "Injecting malware...\n";
    }

    public function stealData() {
        echo "Stealing data...\n";
    }

    public function coverTracks() {
        echo "Covering tracks...\n";
    }
}

$hackHandler = new HackHandler();
$hackHandler->handle();

To ensure this cutting-edge piece of software is built on the SOLID principles, all we need to do at this point is make sure each interface defines a single responsibility:

interface CyberpunkHacker {
    public function handle();
}

interface ConnectToMatrix {
    public function connect();
}

interface AcquireTarget {
    public function acquire();
}

interface InjectMalware {
    public function inject();
}

interface StealData {
    public function steal();
}

interface CoverTracks {
    public function cover();
}

class HackHandler implements CyberpunkHacker, ConnectToMatrix, AcquireTarget, InjectMalware, StealData, CoverTracks {
    public function handle() {
        $this->connect();
        $this->acquire();
        $this->inject();
        $this->steal();
        $this->cover();
    }

    public function connect() {
        echo "Connecting to Matrix...\n";
    }

    public function acquire() {
        echo "Acquiring target...\n";
    }

    public function inject() {
        echo "Injecting malware...\n";
    }

    public function steal() {
        echo "Stealing data...\n";
    }

    public function cover() {
        echo "Covering tracks...\n";
    }
}

$hackHandler = new HackHandler();
$hackHandler->handle();
// Output:
// Connecting to Matrix...
// Acquiring target...
// Injecting malware...
// Stealing data...
// Covering tracks...
  1. SOLID principles:Single Responsibility Principle (SRP): Each interface defines a single responsibility, and the HackHandler class only needs to implement the interfaces that it needs.
  2. Open/Closed Principle (OCP): The HackHandler class is open to extension, but closed to modification. The template method and the individual steps of the algorithm are defined in the interfaces, so new functionality can be added by creating new classes that implement the interfaces, without modifying the existing code.
  3. Liskov Substitution Principle (LSP): The HackHandler class can be substituted for any of the interfaces it implements, because it follows the contracts defined by the interfaces.
  4. Interface Segregation Principle (ISP): The interfaces define a small, focused set of methods, which ensures that the classes that implement them only need to implement the methods that they need.
  5. Dependency Inversion Principle (DIP): The HackHandler class depends on interfaces and not on concrete classes, this makes the code more flexible and easier to test, since the dependencies can be mocked or stubbed.
Related Posts
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.Required fields are marked *